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What are the differences between Excel 2010, 2013 and 2016?


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#1 Martybruce

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Posted 11 May 2015 - 07:27 PM

Can I use the excel 2013 tutorial with version 2007, or is it better to use the 2007 version if that is the copy I have?

 

Thanks



#2 Mike

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 03:17 PM

You should use the Excel 2007 course to learn Excel 2007 if this is the version you will be using to follow-through with the lessons but I'd strongly advise you to learn the 2013 version if you are able to purchase an upgrade to your 2007 software.

 

You would find it very tedious to work-around the changes in the user interface between Excel 2007 and Excel 2013 in the lessons.   But if you learn Excel 2013 you won't,  find any difficulties in applying your Excel 2013 skills using the older 2007 and 2010 versions.  

 

Excel 2013 is vastly improved with many new features that you will want to use.  You will (of course) miss the new Excel 2013 features and improved ease-of-use when using one of the older versions.

 

2013 has some radical and hugely useful  new features. Some of the major improvements are:  

  • Excel 2013 has been designed to work with Cloud Computing far more easily than with older versions (for more details see Essential Skills Session 8: Cloud Computing).  Cloud computing provides a brand new way to share workbooks with any user (even users with Android or iPad pad devices, Apple PC users and users that don't have any version of Excel installed).  Gone are the days when you had to worry whether the recipient of an Excel attachment had the right version of Excel to be able to even open it!
  • Excel 2013 has a quite amazing and hugely useful new feature called Flash Fill that you can use to quickly complete tasks that were often very complex in Excel 2010 (see an overview of this in Essential Skills Lesson 2-21: Use Flash Fill to solve common problems).  Most Excel 2013 users haven't even noticed this feature yet as it isn't at all obvious how it works until you've worked through the four Flash Fill lessons.  But once you learn how to use it you'll wonder how you ever lived without it!
  • The way you create charts has also been completely re-designed in Excel 2013 and it is now extremely easy to create and customize charts (for more details see Essential Skills Session 5: Charts and Graphics).  Charting used to be very quirky in earlier Excel versions but now it is completely logical and intuitive.
  • For expert users working with relational data (but this only be of interest to very advanced Excel users), Excel 2013 also brings data modelling, OLAP and Business Intelligence into the mainstream for the first time by incorporating many features from Microsoft's Power Pivot OLAP product into the standard version of Excel.  Watch Session 6: The Data Model, OLAP MDX and BI to see Excel's ability to create OLAP Pivot tables that can summarize fields from multiple tables. 

Of course there are many more detail improvements as well throughout Excel 2013 but the above four are the big ones for me.  Any one of them would make the upgrade worthwhile but all four together make the upgrade to 2013 compelling.

 

Best Regards

 

 

Mike Smart


Mike Smart is the author of ten world best-selling Excel books. The books are available in printed form for for Excel 2007, Excel 2010, Excel 2013, Excel 2016 for Windows and Excel 2016 for Apple Mac. Mike has also recorded over 850 video lessons (that you can watch online) for Excel 2007, Excel 2010 and Excel 2013.
Mike Smart is also part of the team that answers questions posted on the ExcelCentral.com forums.


#3 Jenny M

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 01:20 PM

This is a similar question to the above, but 2010 vs. 2016.

 

At present I have 2010 at work, but I don't know what the chances are of getting 2016 (the executive director has it, but no one else seems interested).  I am thinking of buying the books.  Which version would you recommend?

 

Thanks!



#4 Mike

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 10:45 PM

Hi Jenny

 

If you are using Excel 2010 then logically you should learn using the 2010 course.

 

Best Regards

 

Mike Smart


Mike Smart is the author of ten world best-selling Excel books. The books are available in printed form for for Excel 2007, Excel 2010, Excel 2013, Excel 2016 for Windows and Excel 2016 for Apple Mac. Mike has also recorded over 850 video lessons (that you can watch online) for Excel 2007, Excel 2010 and Excel 2013.
Mike Smart is also part of the team that answers questions posted on the ExcelCentral.com forums.


#5 Jenny M

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 12:26 PM

Thank you - I'm sorry I wasn't clear.  My question is mostly because we might switch to 2016 sometime in the future.  If I get a 2010 book, will it be conspicuously out of date when we upgrade?  Or if I get a 2016 book, will I be confused as long as we still have 2010?

 

You were very clear above on some differences between 2007 and 2013; I wondered if the contrast was similar for 2010 vs. 2016.

 

Thanks!



#6 Mike

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Posted 28 July 2016 - 03:33 PM

Dear Jenny

 

There is very little difference between Excel 2013 and Excel 2016 except for the inclusion of some new OLAP/Business Intelligence tools.

 

In the new Excel 2016 Expert Skills book we have separated the OLAP related features into a 100-page separate section of the book  This is because OLAP/BI skills are not of value to most Excel users.  The following text is taken from the "Introduction to OLAP sessions" introduction in the 2016 Expert Skills book:

 

***

The contents of the next three sessions will be challenging to most readers.  Your Excel skills are now very advanced and would already be regarded as Expert level by any employer.  The concepts presented in the next three sessions are not commonly found in Excel users (even IT professionals often struggle with data modeling and OLAP concepts).  

 

The Excel 2013 and 2016 versions have added some extremely sophisticated OLAP-related tools to the standard Excel product.  It has been estimated that only 10% of Excel users are able to use the regular pivot tables that you mastered in: Session Eight: Pivot Tables.  It is unlikely that even 1% of Excel users will venture into the bold new world of OLAP (OnLine Analytical Processing).
 
The material that follows is of necessity more complex than in the previous sessions.  This is because, in order to use the new Excel OLAP-related tools, you will first need to acquire a substantial amount of relational database theory.  All of this theory is gradually introduced in the following three OLAP-related sessions as you explore each new tool’s features.
 
Overview of Excel’s new OLAP-related features
 
The new Excel 2013/2016 standard features are:
  1. The Data Model and OLAP Pivot Table (introduced in Excel 2013).  Covered in: Session Nine: Data Modeling, OLAP and Business Intelligence.The data model provides the ability to combine related data into an OLAP data model (with defined key relationships).  This enables you to perform more powerful analysis (using an OLAP pivot table) and to work with Big Data (data containing over 1,048,576 rows)
  2. 3D Maps (introduced in Excel 2016), a product previously known as Power Maps.  Covered in: Session Ten: 3D Maps.  3D Maps provide the ability to superimpose visualizations of OLAP source data upon geographic maps (both in street and satellite view).  Visualizations can then be animated along a timeline.  You are also able to create aerial video tours of your data (where you are able to fly around the three dimensional landscape in a virtual helicopter).
  3. Get & Transform (introduced in Excel 2016), a product previously known as Power Query.  Covered in: Session Eleven: Create Get & Transform queries.  Get & Transform enables you to transform and combine data from multiple data sources such as web pages, databases, CSV files, and worksheet tables.  You can create calculated fields within Big Data (data containing over 1,048,576 rows) and then load the result directly into a data model or linked Excel table.  You are also able to create de-normalized data extracts from relational databases by defining key relationships.  
***
If you feel that Excel 2016's new OLAP tools will be of value to you then I would recommend that you update to Excel 2016 to enable you to use these tools.  You may not be able to open workbooks that incorporate the new Excel 2016 tools using earlier Excel versions.
 
Let me know if this is not the information you were looking for.
 
Best Regards
 
 
Mike Smart

Mike Smart is the author of ten world best-selling Excel books. The books are available in printed form for for Excel 2007, Excel 2010, Excel 2013, Excel 2016 for Windows and Excel 2016 for Apple Mac. Mike has also recorded over 850 video lessons (that you can watch online) for Excel 2007, Excel 2010 and Excel 2013.
Mike Smart is also part of the team that answers questions posted on the ExcelCentral.com forums.


#7 Guest_Kerri_*

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 07:24 PM

Concerning these differences, our office uses 2016 and I'm taking the 2013 course since they are similar.  I've struck on the Help Button lesson - Lesson 1-18 - and there is no help "?" button.  Is there some different way to access this?  I'm not able to locate it thus far.



#8 Mike

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 11:06 AM

Dear Kerri

 

The help system has some new features with the Tell Me Help system introduced in the 2016 release.  

 

If you download the free Excel 2016  Basic Skills e-book you'll find these differences documented in the lessons:

 

  • Lesson 1‐18: Use the Tell Me help system
  • Lesson 1‐19: Use other help features.

 

If you are learning Excel 2016 I'd recommend that you purchase the full Excel 2016 books (or e-books).  The books precisely details the small differences between Excel 2016 and Excel 2013 (that you may encounter when using the Excel 2013 video course with the 2016 release).  You'll also benefit from comprehensive coverage of the new OLAP/BI tools (detailed more fully in an earlier reply on this thread and covered comprehensively in the Excel 2016 Expert Skills book).

 

Best Regards

 

Mike Smart


Mike Smart is the author of ten world best-selling Excel books. The books are available in printed form for for Excel 2007, Excel 2010, Excel 2013, Excel 2016 for Windows and Excel 2016 for Apple Mac. Mike has also recorded over 850 video lessons (that you can watch online) for Excel 2007, Excel 2010 and Excel 2013.
Mike Smart is also part of the team that answers questions posted on the ExcelCentral.com forums.




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